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  • Bath Bomb Advise

    Hi there

    I have been making bath bombs now for a little while and enjoying bathing in them myself and on the odd occasion sharing them with family for them to use But now I am considering trying to sell them and make a small business out of it. I understand about the 26 allergens and needing a safety assessment before selling and insurance etc, but due to being a tad ill all the time and there being no soap making courses available around here at all for help, I was wondering if anyone could point me in a great direction for learning to label Bath bombs. I have bought a couple to try and get an idea, but they are both labelled so differently, its confusing

    Also for the self assessment, I know this might sound like a silly question, but do they call to your home to watch you make the soap, or do you send them a soap you made, or is it simply that you pay the money and they send you a letter saying you paid and a list of ingredients that you are allowed to use in your bath bombs?

    Thank you in advance for any advise anyone can give me and sorry for the newbie questions, but I guess we all start somewhere
    Last edited by Xahia; 24-06-2011, 07:17 PM.

  • #2
    Hi
    Im in a similar situation, loved making them and now about to start selling them. I have been reading and re reading the cosmetic regulations and Im nearly there with my labelling. If you google Plush Folly, they do elearning on labelling and other aspects of selling. Im very tempted but at £25 Im not sure I want to keep spending more money. My hubby was laughing at me last week when I had to buy a bath bomb for 'research purposes'!!!
    I bought a self assessment from Bathbomb.biz which gives me a set group of ingredients and ratios that I can use. Im still a little confused on this one which is partly what has stopped me going much further yet. Ive read about people having to have products sent for microbiological testing but Ive been told I dont need to, presumably as I have such a limited set of ingredients involving no water or preservatives.
    Hope you get some more information and good luck
    Donna
    FACEBOOK PAGE:http://www.facebook.com/pages/Busyfi...08530162507226

    Comment


    • #3
      Thank you Donna, I have contacted Plush Folly to see if they can offer any help/advice

      Okay, whilst I am here, labeling soap seems like a trade secret..lol

      I just need one knowledgable person to show me once, then I can learn from there, but with no courses, available anywhere around where I live, and the bath bombs that I purchased, contradicting themselves with the labeling, I'm just lost, and this is all that is putting me off at the moment, because I really would like to get this right, and get going with it all

      One bath bomb I have here, its wrapped in cellophane and the ingredients are stated as : Apple Bath Bomb - Sodium Bicarbonate, Citric Acid, Maize, Starch, Sodium Silicate, Parfum, Olive Oil, Ci 11680, 77266, 42090, 19140, 15985, 14700, 17200, 77891. Thats the entire ingredients on the wrapper... Is that correct labeling?

      Obviously my ingredients are a little different, I just make mine out of : Sodium Bicarbonate, Citric Acid, Corn Flour, Witch Hazel Spray, Powder Colouring and a Concentrate Fragrance.

      I know you have to add Aqua, if/when you add water to the mix.

      I just make basic bath bombs at the moment and once up and running, would just like to try and get a turn around on all the money I had to save to get this done legally with self assessment and insurance etc. So just going to stay basic for a while, because I know how to make them okay

      My family say that my bath bombs are great, no complaints

      So please any advise here would be greatly appreciated and also stop my headaches from where I am banging my head on the desk, going around in circles

      Thank you

      Sharon
      Last edited by Xahia; 10-05-2011, 10:48 AM.

      Comment


      • #4
        where are you based?
        Racheal
        www.soapsudsandsalts.co.uk

        Comment


        • #5
          I live in West Glamorgan - Wales

          Comment


          • #6
            try soap school - they are close to you and Sarah does some very good business courses http://www.soapschool.com/

            Comment


            • #7
              Hi Madpiano, not too sure what you consider "close", but the soap school is 260 plus miles away from me, with a travel time of over four and a quarter hours by car, each way, and thats without being hit by any traffic....
              So thank you for the advice, it's much appreciated, but way too far for me to travel.
              Last edited by Xahia; 29-05-2011, 06:40 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Have you tried Bath-Bomb.com this is what Jude does as a living and she may be able to guide you as to what is needed, labelling certificates etc.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thank you for the recommendation, Caroline

                  I'll try and summarise the position with regard to making, labelling and selling bath bombs and soaps...

                  ASSESSMENTS
                  * You will need some kind of safety assessment from a qualified person (usually a chemist who has spe******ed in the field of cosmetics manufacture. I recommend Scott of Cosemeticas Safety Assessments http://www.cosmeticsafetyassessment....FUtC4QodQnxK8Q He has a range of reasonably priced assessment packages starting at £40 ish...

                  * Your assessment will include a list of ingredients, fragrances, colours and some (safe) essential oils...you can use any of the ingredients in your bath bomb/soap etc but you don't have to use them all - remember the assessment is not a recipe!

                  * If your assessment doesn't include something - you can't use it and still be insured. The assessment is the assessor's statement of opinion that the ingredients, when combined are safe for the purposes they were intended. If you were ever sued because your product caused someone a problem, the assessor may be required to stand up in court and stand by his assessment of safety - so it is a serious matter...

                  * My other bit of advice is Never, ever buy an assessment package that restricts you to one or two suppliers...This is less common nowadays but you used to purchase assessments from a couple of companies that had their name on the assessment - if the company goes bust you would have to get new assessments And it's not good business practice to tie yourself to one supplier...

                  INSURANCE

                  * I recommend Ian Wallace http://www.craftinsurance.co.uk/ who will provide a very good insurance for crafters....get the assessments first - he will ask if you have them

                  * The insurance will usually include Public Liability and Product liability insurance - both of these are important...but I don't have the time and space to explain them both - google it and read (at least) some summaries...

                  LABELLING

                  * There is a raft of legislation about cosmetics labelling, but it's really not as complicated as it may seem.
                  • You need to list the ingredients in order of volume - so if you bath bomb contains more Sodium than anything else Sodium goes first.
                  • You need to use the INCI name (usually latin but often the chemical name) - INCI stands for International Nomenclature for Cosmetics Ingredients (nomenclature simply means "use of a name"). So Sodium is Sodium Bicarbonate - Water is Aqua - Corn Starch is Zea Mays - find yourself a directory http://www.saratogascents.com/inci_names.html I found this after a quick google search...there are others that are more information, some are less - just find one that works.
                  • Colours - need to be identified by their CI (Colour Index) number - the colours you purchase should have a CI number. Some manufactuers make pretty generic ingredients labels for soaps and bath bombs and will put something like this CI +/- 11680, 77266, 42090, 19140, 15985, 14700, 17200, 77891 - this means that that bath bomb MAY contain a blue colour or a yellow or a red etc - I prefer to put the actual colour used...
                  • If you mix red and blue to get your purple you can put CI 12345/12456 to indicate you've used both red and blue (where the numbers are the CI numbers of your red and blue) if that makes sense...
                  • Fragrance Oils should be of cosmetic grade and can be identified by the word Parfum.
                  • Essential Oils MUST be identified by their INCI name i.e. Lavender Essential Oil = Lavandula Augustifolia (there are often different versions of EO's so make sure your INCI name is the right one)...
                  • ALLERGENS - You need to make sure that your label includes any allergens that may be present in the fragrance or Essential Oil...it would take too long to explain how you calculate this but the MSDS for the fragrance/essential oil, should have a list of the allergens present and in what percentage and you should then be able to calculate how much of that allergen is present in the finished product. This is very important especially for those who suffer from allergies...they rely on the correct labelling to be safe...
                  PRODUCT INFORMATION FILES

                  * This is one of the biggest tasks for anyone making and selling their own products - and it is an ongoing piece of work.
                  * When you make a batch of bath bombs or soaps, you need to record the batch numbers of the ingredients and you need to give your batch a batch number - and put it on the label.
                  * My PIF's include an image of the product, the packaging of the product - a label and a list of the suppliers of each ingredient...
                  * Your assessor should be able to help more with PIF's but suffice it to say that, if Trading Standards knock on your door they can require that you produce your PIF (they would usually give you 3 days or more to produce it)....
                  * And the reason for the PIF? So that, if something went horribly wrong, you can trace back any suspecting materials you may have used and the suppliers can go back through their supply chain...

                  Hope some of this is helpful
                  for bath bomb, soap & Skincare kits
                  plus Soap Base, Bath Bomb Ingredients, Butters,
                  Oils and packaging for Bath & Body Products

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Wow, I could have done with you a year ago!!! :-)
                    FACEBOOK PAGE:http://www.facebook.com/pages/Busyfi...08530162507226

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thank you so much for the great advice and help, it's much appreciated.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Just had a look at your web and packaging so going to pop back and have a more lenghty look soon!

                        Anita
                        Bath Bomb Creations.
                        Originally posted by Bath-Bomb.Com View Post
                        Thank you for the recommendation, Caroline

                        I'll try and summarise the position with regard to making, labelling and selling bath bombs and soaps...

                        ASSESSMENTS
                        * You will need some kind of safety assessment from a qualified person (usually a chemist who has spe******ed in the field of cosmetics manufacture. I recommend Scott of Cosemeticas Safety Assessments http://www.cosmeticsafetyassessment....FUtC4QodQnxK8Q He has a range of reasonably priced assessment packages starting at £40 ish...

                        * Your assessment will include a list of ingredients, fragrances, colours and some (safe) essential oils...you can use any of the ingredients in your bath bomb/soap etc but you don't have to use them all - remember the assessment is not a recipe!

                        * If your assessment doesn't include something - you can't use it and still be insured. The assessment is the assessor's statement of opinion that the ingredients, when combined are safe for the purposes they were intended. If you were ever sued because your product caused someone a problem, the assessor may be required to stand up in court and stand by his assessment of safety - so it is a serious matter...

                        * My other bit of advice is Never, ever buy an assessment package that restricts you to one or two suppliers...This is less common nowadays but you used to purchase assessments from a couple of companies that had their name on the assessment - if the company goes bust you would have to get new assessments And it's not good business practice to tie yourself to one supplier...

                        INSURANCE

                        * I recommend Ian Wallace http://www.craftinsurance.co.uk/ who will provide a very good insurance for crafters....get the assessments first - he will ask if you have them

                        * The insurance will usually include Public Liability and Product liability insurance - both of these are important...but I don't have the time and space to explain them both - google it and read (at least) some summaries...

                        LABELLING

                        * There is a raft of legislation about cosmetics labelling, but it's really not as complicated as it may seem.
                        • You need to list the ingredients in order of volume - so if you bath bomb contains more Sodium than anything else Sodium goes first.
                        • You need to use the INCI name (usually latin but often the chemical name) - INCI stands for International Nomenclature for Cosmetics Ingredients (nomenclature simply means "use of a name"). So Sodium is Sodium Bicarbonate - Water is Aqua - Corn Starch is Zea Mays - find yourself a directory http://www.saratogascents.com/inci_names.html I found this after a quick google search...there are others that are more information, some are less - just find one that works.
                        • Colours - need to be identified by their CI (Colour Index) number - the colours you purchase should have a CI number. Some manufactuers make pretty generic ingredients labels for soaps and bath bombs and will put something like this CI +/- 11680, 77266, 42090, 19140, 15985, 14700, 17200, 77891 - this means that that bath bomb MAY contain a blue colour or a yellow or a red etc - I prefer to put the actual colour used...
                        • If you mix red and blue to get your purple you can put CI 12345/12456 to indicate you've used both red and blue (where the numbers are the CI numbers of your red and blue) if that makes sense...
                        • Fragrance Oils should be of cosmetic grade and can be identified by the word Parfum.
                        • Essential Oils MUST be identified by their INCI name i.e. Lavender Essential Oil = Lavandula Augustifolia (there are often different versions of EO's so make sure your INCI name is the right one)...
                        • ALLERGENS - You need to make sure that your label includes any allergens that may be present in the fragrance or Essential Oil...it would take too long to explain how you calculate this but the MSDS for the fragrance/essential oil, should have a list of the allergens present and in what percentage and you should then be able to calculate how much of that allergen is present in the finished product. This is very important especially for those who suffer from allergies...they rely on the correct labelling to be safe...
                        PRODUCT INFORMATION FILES

                        * This is one of the biggest tasks for anyone making and selling their own products - and it is an ongoing piece of work.
                        * When you make a batch of bath bombs or soaps, you need to record the batch numbers of the ingredients and you need to give your batch a batch number - and put it on the label.
                        * My PIF's include an image of the product, the packaging of the product - a label and a list of the suppliers of each ingredient...
                        * Your assessor should be able to help more with PIF's but suffice it to say that, if Trading Standards knock on your door they can require that you produce your PIF (they would usually give you 3 days or more to produce it)....
                        * And the reason for the PIF? So that, if something went horribly wrong, you can trace back any suspecting materials you may have used and the suppliers can go back through their supply chain...

                        Hope some of this is helpful

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Absolutely wonderful description bath-bomb !

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Bath-Bomb that is a great reply, it's what I've been looking for.

                            Kind Regards
                            Adelyn x

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Im still a little puzzled on this one which is partially what has ceased me going much further yet. Ive study about individuals having to have items sent for microbiological examining but Ive been informed I do not need to, presumably as I have such a restricted set of components including no standard water or additives.
                              Tanning Lotions | Fake Bake

                              Comment

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