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  • anchoring fragrance CP soap

    hey, i have been noticing the use of orris root or castor oil as a way to 'anchor' fragrances in CP soap, particuarly in american made soaps.Does anyone have any experience of this that they can share?
    amanda
    Amanda


    www.janeexelbys.blogspot.com

  • #2
    I have seen this in recipes too.
    Jules
    Crafts - Self prescribed therapy!

    Scents-Ability - Blog
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    • #3
      I always use a tsp of orris root to anchor my e/os

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      • #4
        anchoring EOs

        Never heard of using orris root powder to anchor EOs in CP soap - but that doesn't mean anything - I've never heard of LOTS of things!

        I am just a tad afraid of orris root, however, because it is in the...ragweed?? family. Chamomile is. Can exacerbate allergies in the exceedingly sensitive...but then, they should rad the ingredients list, shouldn't they!

        I use a goodly amount of castor oil in all my soap in order to have great lather. But it goes in initially, not at trace - are you saying someone says to add a little castor oil mixed with your EOs at trace? Hmmm, how interesting.

        I have always had trouble keeping my EOs and even FOs in the soap - some turn really awful, some just disappear...and I assumed it was due to the heat after I pour, or more likely, to the milk. I keep the heat down fairly well because mine is fresh goat milk soap - no water at all. But after I pour it into the loaf mold, it sometimes heats up a lot, sometimes just a little. It's just so cosmic.

        Then I decided to make unscented soap and grate it after a few days and add the EOs then, so there's no chance of losing them - what a pain in the patootie. Goes against my basic philosophy that the goal is to keep work to a minimum.

        When I approach shop owners about carrying my soap, they always say it is too strong and will compete with other soap and candle fragrances in their store...I think it's just a way to say "go away i have too much soap inventory as it is."


        Individuals at markets say it does not smell very strong...it smells good and they would want it to last all day on them...I explain that no, it isn't a perfume bar ... and then I started making solid perfume in little tins to sell along with the soap. Brilliant...yes, I know...heh...still no sales....

        BUT, after I returned from a market not long ago, I was utterly exhausted and just left everything in the big rubbermaid tubs I hauled everything in...and promptly forgot all about it...about 2 weeks later, I opened the tubs, and ... AMAZING! All the soap bars in each tub smelled SO STRONG!! Miracle? Magic?? Well, I also had left a small bottle of each particular type of EO in with each particular scent of soap...and they'd gotten warm and I guess you could say they fumed or bloomed or SOMEthing...but WOW, does all that soap smell terrific and i don't have to worry about too much in the bar affecting anyone adversely! COOL!!

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        • #5
          it is strqange how some lose their fragrances & others dont. Problem is I think partic EOs smell stronger in use ie when wet & warm , than they do in the unused bar. I agree rebatching is a pain & I dont think looks as good- ?? swirls are hopeless. I will try the orris root with lavender i think & let u know how it goes. do you think the castor oil works well? maybe i will do 3 x small batches wi nothing, orris & castos so i can compare & contrast- yes i will!
          just checked out msds & allergy info & nothing in partic pops up.
          Last edited by soap queen; 14-06-2009, 11:43 AM. Reason: further info
          Amanda


          www.janeexelbys.blogspot.com

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          • #6
            Fragrances - whether in soaps, perfume oils or potpourris etc. need a fixative.

            FOs have these built in - for EOs you need to blend and add one or more of the spice/wood/resin EOs.

            Myrrh or Frankincense are good fixatives; Clove can enhance and fix a rose blend; Patchouli fixes well but can overpower.

            Orris root is widely used in potpourris but not recommended for skin preparations.
            ElaineJ soap and other stuff
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            • #7
              I tried orris root, just as an exercise, I don't think it did much for the fragrance, there are better ways but I wasn't keen on the orange speckles it left, speckles maybe Ok in one soap but I did not want speckles in every soapI made!

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              • #8
                I have been reading up on this on the net, I think I will leave it alone, as from what I've read is that it sensitises the skin.

                Edited for awful spelling!

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                • #9
                  results at last

                  2 weeks ago I made 3 small batches as a test using lav EO; one with added orris root, one added castor oil and one with just EO. After 2 weeks curing - No discernable difference at all!!!! I will let cure for another 2 weeks. This is a very unscientific test but i think i will stick to 'no fixative' and use vanilla to anchor my lavender. lol
                  amanda
                  Amanda


                  www.janeexelbys.blogspot.com

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                  • #10
                    I've found that lavender sticks quite well - citrus though are quite fugitive - may chang helps here or myrrh (goes very nicely with grapefruit).

                    You could try a little carraway with the lavender - sort of adds a different dimension.
                    ElaineJ soap and other stuff
                    website
                    blog

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                    • #11
                      great idea re carraway-one for a next experiment I think. You are right about citrus and of course the reduced amounts able to be used doesn't help. I find that lemongrass or verbena or melissa can be used to good effect though and are a lot more 'sticky'.
                      amanda
                      Amanda


                      www.janeexelbys.blogspot.com

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                      • #12
                        anchorage fragances

                        Originally posted by soap queen View Post
                        hey, i have been noticing the use of orris root or castor oil as a way to 'anchor' fragrances in CP soap, particuarly in american made soaps.Does anyone have any experience of this that they can share?
                        amanda

                        hi!!

                        the perfume fixations techniques in soaps, candles and perfumery is one of the most important aspects in perfumery. the goal is so simple: our fragances in our soaps, candles and perfumes has to stay during a long time.

                        many efforts have been done with fixative products: resins, essential oils, amber type... but the best one of the world is not listed

                        the most important fixative in the world is an olives derivatives obtained by biotechnological processes.

                        it is simple: this fixative protects the fragance and let it dissolve the fragance in the sebum ( in case of the skin or in the sebum of the soaps and candles )

                        it results in a very long lasting fixative properties.

                        there is a commercial reference called JIPPI-SHARK, from spain.

                        best regards

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                        • #13
                          Please note that this thread is some 6 years old
                          Do not watch this space

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