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Sterling silver - what about the hallmark?

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  • 3dDave
    replied
    Originally posted by House of Silver View Post
    Hallmarking by assay office can be expensive if you only make few items. Currently assay office charges around £2 to mark the item and there is a minimum charge of £20 plus VAT. Then as mentioned above, you would need to register with assay office and get your mark made. it is for 10 years and cost few hundred pounds. So best option is to send the items with somebody else who is registered with assay office or make items which are less than 7.8g in weight and stump them with 925 yorself.
    Hi, they asked the question in 2010...probably sorted by now...

    Dave, moderator.

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  • House of Silver
    replied
    Hallmarking by assay office can be expensive if you only make few items. Currently assay office charges around £2 to mark the item and there is a minimum charge of £20 plus VAT. Then as mentioned above, you would need to register with assay office and get your mark made. it is for 10 years and cost few hundred pounds. So best option is to send the items with somebody else who is registered with assay office or make items which are less than 7.8g in weight and stump them with 925 yorself.

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  • sterlingsilverjewels
    replied
    Silver Jewerly Online India

    Pure .925 ,sterling silver jewellery online in India. Find latest and unique charms, bracelets, bangles, earring, rings, necklace, chains, anklets, pendants, jewellery sets and accessories. Customized silver jewellery gift items for her and him.

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  • NaomiG Jewellery
    replied
    This is a really helpful thread.

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  • alibear
    replied
    Andrew - If you want to hallmark your own pieces you have to pay have a stamp made (and pay again to have it registered with the assay office every 5 or 10 years if I remember rightly) called a makers mark. You keep this at your own workshop (under lock and key if you have any sense!) and stamp each item you want hallmarking yourself with your makers mark. The makers mark is just one of the indentations in the row and you then send your item to the hallmarking office for them to test your metal, they take a scraping and analyse the metal content. Once they are happy that your metal meets the requirements they add the rest of the marks in the row and send it back to you.

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  • AndrewCampbell
    replied
    I wonder how one goes about to go get a hallmark of their own to stamp on in-house produced silver. I would suppose that the criteria to do so must be pretty stringent. Everyone would be questioning silver jewellery in the shops if there weren't some serious regulations in place.

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  • JasminJ
    replied
    Hi again Nichola! Funnily enough I asked this very question to my Assay Office a couple of days back and I received an email back from the Head of Assay Office Training & Trading Standards Liaison, who I think will not mind me quoting him: "The dealers notice [for online businesses] is not a legal requirement as yet (the law always takes a while to catch up) but we have been advising people to do so, you can also if you wish offer a link into our website" - so I think it's in the planning, so we might as well do it sooner, than forget and fall foul of the law later on! I'm off to tweak my website.

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  • Nichola_jh
    replied
    Thank you thats helpful to know.

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  • mizgeorge
    replied
    There's no requirement to show a dealers notice on any website - many people do it voluntarily to reassure their customers. If you sell in person (even a table at a school fair) you must, however, display a full A4 size notice.

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  • Nichola_jh
    replied
    [QUOTE=mizgeorge;391906]Remember also that if you're selling sterling silver (even under the weight limit and unhallmarked) you must display a dealers notice, which can be downloaded here:

    Hi, sorry for picking up an old post, but I just wanted to know, do you have to display the dealers notice on a website if selling under the weight limit?
    Thank you

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  • SuzySu
    replied
    Thanks for your advice. Once I start selling I will make sure to display the notice.

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  • mizgeorge
    replied
    You read correctly It's easy to point out that pieces are below the hallmark requirement weight though. A 925 stamp does help this, but has no legal standing at all, and sadly is often misused.

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  • muffin789
    replied
    I guess you do - you said above that you wanted to be able to tell people you're using sterling silver (even if it's not hallmarked), so I guess the dealers notice is a requirement

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  • SuzySu
    replied
    Eeek. So I must display a notice saying "check it's hallmarked for your safety" when I'm not hallmarking mine (provided they are under 7.78g). Won't that raise some awkward questions?

    Or did I read it wrong?

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  • mizgeorge
    replied
    Remember also that if you're selling sterling silver (even under the weight limit and unhallmarked) you must display a dealers notice, which can be downloaded here: http://www.theassayoffice.co.uk/dealers_notices.html

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