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How many will take up crafting during the Coronavirus?

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  • How many will take up crafting during the Coronavirus?

    Although I have been a member for a few years, I have not really had the time to get to know this site as I work full time. But now as times are changing and I have had to temporarily close my beautiful shop during the pandemic I find myself picking up hobbies I had thought I would not be able to do till retirement. So on looking around the site to familiarise myself with what its all about I discovered the statistics
    of the record number of people online. I wonder what that will increase to over the coming months? A positive out of a negative if we can introduce people to the wonderful world of crafting. I have posted out some spare scrapbooking supplies to a couple of friends who have expressed interest in doing this while they are self isolating. I can't wait to see what treasured memories they will capture.
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  • #2
    I think crafting is good Anj, the only thing I hate is at an event and someone who has just started waltzes up, slams things on a table badly finished selling for peanuts.

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    • #3
      I would imagine that those who have had a bit of a desire to try a new craft but always been too busy with work etc would dig out supplies, dust the boxes off and have a go. Quite a few in the groups I use have got kids crafting or painting etc. Nothing like a bit of isolation to start a surge in crafting, just hope the stores and shops stay open long enough to buy stuff. I’d have thought it a golden opportunity for craft suppliers to mass advertise as it’d be like shooting fish in a barrel but not so far 🤔

      As Caroline said, it is a real annoyance when you do an event and someone turns up with a poor quality product or even a “like” product and is selling for next to nothing. Luckily I don’t get that as paper cutters aren’t common at craft fairs but generally, low pricing to sell is what pulls down craft fair prices for all and that makes higher quality products hard to sell 🤷🏻‍♂️

      Dave.

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      • #4
        The craft event that Mo and I do people like that wouldn't last but be asked to leave.No bought in goods and the crafter and their work are vetted before being accepted. To sell your work at a sensible price to discerning collectors I am afraid you need to pay for a quality show and afre unlikely to get that in the average church / town hall type show. They tend to be populated by people just sellig what they makde in order to make more.
        Pete
        "Where the spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art" ... Leonardo Da Vinci
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        • #5
          Thanks bodrighy

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          • #6
            Originally posted by bodrighy View Post
            The craft event that Mo and I do people like that wouldn't last but be asked to leave.No bought in goods and the crafter and their work are vetted before being accepted. To sell your work at a sensible price to discerning collectors I am afraid you need to pay for a quality show and afre unlikely to get that in the average church / town hall type show. They tend to be populated by people just sellig what they makde in order to make more.
            Pete
            Hi Bodrighy.
            Difficult to get the right mix sometimes. I used the Rooftop Market in Rosebank for years - I also used the Waterfront market in Cape Town as well as Kirstenbosch Gardens craft market. I sold hand made photo frames, desk blotters, clocks, boxes, covered pencils, and many, many other items - all crafted with a cardboard base from from Sappi and Mondi paper mills in South Africa and covered with coverings from Europe; via Johannesburg.
            I made sure there was a good mix of products on show. Often people bring their children with them and are looking for something 'affordable'. I used to have one table just devoted to pencils - I would display at least 500 pencils at a time - all laid out - different colours from scrap offcuts from my other products - they made an absolutely dazzling display and would always sell very well - because they were so cheap (Important to have a brass-covered eraser on each pencil - it adds to the sparkle!). I also had hand-made desk tidies and pencil boxes displayed on that table as well, so if a parent could afford it they would buy those items as well. Pencil coverings were prepared using my Swift gluer back in a country far away in the north - some 1000 miles beyond the Limpopo River, where I had a craft house and worked together with four nationals.
            The Rosebank market owners in Johannesburg made a few million Rands from their market. I think it was two barristers originally. They ran the market from a fantastic area on the rooftop of an extremely upmarket shopping mall. They were also very sympathetic and understanding and were a cultured couple, fully in smpathy with genuine crafters. That market, together with the other two would draw thousands of visitors every Sunday. Unfotunately in the UK I have found a number of craft market owners to be nothing but very hard-nosed business owners and very little else. But I am sure there are many good ones among them all.
            .....................

            There were some amusing incidents - and others. One day, when I had a table on the Waterfront in Cape Town a dear young lady had a table a few yards down fom mine. She was demonstrating the art of book-binding and selling the results. For a book press she placed two smooth planks on the floor with the freshly glued book in between and would jump up and down enthusiastically on her book press and hey presto! display to the admiring crowds her completed book all nicely glued, etc etc. I think the jumping part was probably a clever sales gimmick. She attracted a lot of customers to my tables. Another guy was a very successful designer of colourful waistcoats. He was visiting for a few weeks and his next stop was Rio Janeiro and then on to some markets in London - a fascinating man to speak to. He lived along a lovely coastal road near Cape Town and employed a number of coloured (mixed race) seamstresses.
            One thing my 'waistcoat friend' emphasised was "you must have a niche market - something different from everyone else. How absolutely true that is.

            http://www.rosebanksundaymarket.co.za/gallery/


            https://uk.images.search.yahoo.com/s...rket&fr=mcafee


            https://capemarkets.co.za/markets/ki...-craft-market/
            Last edited by creative boxes; 03-12-2020, 11:01 PM.

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