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  • Help with Pyrography

    Hello all
    I am quite new to this forum but am slowly getting around it!!
    Just wondered if anyone could help with pyrography. I have used a solid point machine for years on and off mainly for door signs and writing text on to wood, this machine is slowly on its way out so have aquired a janik hot wire machine......this is were my problem is, i just cannot get to grasp with it at all,(writing text is a real mare!) Can anyone offer any hints or tips? If not maybe point me in the right direction of what would be the most reccomended machine to purchase, I would be very thankful for any help many thanks kazzellsxx

  • #2
    Is the temperature adjustable? Obviously you will need to make sure the temperature isn't too high for precise work like lettering.

    The benefit of a hot wire machine is that you can shape the nib to suit your requirement. This means that you can also use a jeweller's file to make a more precise point if necessary.

    Personally, I cannot work with solid point machines and find hot wire to be soooo much easier and more versatile!

    Si.
    Wood Tattoos
    Decorative Pyrography for all Occasions - Author of "Woodburning with Style" (2010) and "Learn to Burn" (2013)
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    • #3
      Thanks Si for the reply......Yes it has a temputure guage on it and have tried many attempts. will keep practicing though, would you reccommend a machine that is best? Thanks again

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      • #4
        Originally posted by kazzells View Post
        Thanks Si for the reply......Yes it has a temputure guage on it and have tried many attempts. will keep practicing though, would you reccommend a machine that is best? Thanks again
        Personally, I use what I call the "Rolls Royce" of pyrography machines... a Peter Childs kit. Have had no issues at all with it, unlike some others I've used before.
        Wood Tattoos
        Decorative Pyrography for all Occasions - Author of "Woodburning with Style" (2010) and "Learn to Burn" (2013)
        Facebook
        Flickr
        Twitter

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        • #5
          Thanks again Si will check out that web site cheers kazzellsx

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          • #6
            Hi Kazzells,

            I've also heard the Peter Child machine is quite effective. However starting off at pyrography is tricky for anyone and it can be just as hard to adapt into using a different machine.
            The machine you use can only help so much, and whatever machine you use, i find practice is the key to progressing.
            So keep on practicing and im sure your results will improve.
            Goodluck!

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            • #7
              Hmmm... what exactly do you find hard, kazzells? What does it do/not do?
              Cheers,
              Scorch

              Scorch's Pyrography : www.scorchpyro.co.uk
              Crafts on Flickr : http://www.flickr.com/photos/tanniso...7606138937826/

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              • #8
                Hi Scorch
                Wow your work is fab!!
                Well i mostly use my solid point for writing text, i have tried with the wire machine but just cannot get the same effect as with the solid point......the wire seems to drag into the wood and i end up ruining the peice of work i have tried different temputures but still have same problem (maybe i am putting to much pressure through the pen! I am determind to crack it.......no matter how long it takes thanks for replying Kazzells x
                P.s if not think i will have to invest in a new solid point machine or a Peter childs one as Si from wood tattoos reccomended(do you have a favourite Machine yourself?
                Last edited by kazzells; 27-10-2008, 06:46 PM.

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                • #9
                  Hi Nader thanks for the advice like everything in crafting you often want instant results will keep practising though. By the way Your work is beautiful Thanks again kazzells x

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                  • #10
                    Hiya, Kazzells

                    Aww, thanks for the kind words!

                    Hmm, maybe it is down to using too much pressure - I hardly put any pressure at all down on the tip. Also, you can use the tip either "way round", if you know what I mean - broad-side on, like a fountain-pen, or sliding it sideways. Thing is, I can't get to grips with a solid-point myself, so we're sort of at separate ends of the spectrum! A wire-tip is more delicate, I think, and doesn't give such a deep, solid burn as a solid point.

                    There's a few hits & tips here, that might help a bit : http://www.scorchpyro.co.uk/Techniques.html

                    You have to kind of "swoop" down to the wood and off again, too, to avoid getting blobby bits at the start and end.

                    Where are you located? If it's near London, I'm at the Misty Moon Craft and Art Fair this Saturday, with my Peter Childs pyro machine. You could try it out if you wanted, and I'd be happy to help any way I can...
                    Cheers,
                    Scorch

                    Scorch's Pyrography : www.scorchpyro.co.uk
                    Crafts on Flickr : http://www.flickr.com/photos/tanniso...7606138937826/

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                    • #11
                      Hi scorch
                      Thanks soo much for the advice i will keep trying, So sorry away at weekend at Derby but thanks for the offer if you are ever in shropshire,in the future let me know and I will come and say hello, thanks again and happy scorching!!xxx

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                      • #12
                        Hi Scorch
                        Just wanted to let u know that since reading your tips have changed the wire in my machine to that of a fountain pen like nib.......WOW what a difference!!! Thanks so much that advice this has helped me from pulling out even more hair !!! Thank you Thank you XX

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                        • #13
                          Aha! So that was it... Excellent - glad to help! I'm pleased to have been of use...
                          Cheers,
                          Scorch

                          Scorch's Pyrography : www.scorchpyro.co.uk
                          Crafts on Flickr : http://www.flickr.com/photos/tanniso...7606138937826/

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                          • #14
                            Help with Pyrography

                            Thanks for that, Scorch! I have put that Site into my favourits to look at later (It's 01.24 in the morning! Just getting to bed - dozed off on the sofa while watching TV!) - Just found the Craft Forum yesterday while Googling for a UK source to buy gourds.

                            I have recently purchased a 'Weller - Woodburning & Hobsoletebyists Kit' from Amazon, and the book ' Pyrography Workbook: A Complete Guide to the Art of Woodburning', with a view to doing some projects with gourds - I had already bought Jim Widess's book 'Gourd Pyrography' and have several books on gourd carving, though as yet no carving tools. I hadn't found a UK source to buy gourds from until yesterday (Latitude Imports - Native American Crafts, Products and Jewellery - I have ordered five bell gourds from them - smooth skinned, 14 x 8cm approx, Retail price: £ 1.40 + £1.90 postage - I spoke to them on the phone then ordered online (5 - postage stays the same for the lot). )

                            I go to Basketry classes at City Lit in Holbourn, here in London, and made contact with Jim Widess of the Caning Shop in California. Jim has written various books, including some fascinating books on crafting gourds. I have been longing to have a go at the projects, but, as I have just said, had been unable, until today, to source gourds here in the UK. We only have a patio, so growing them is likely out of the question. My cousin grew some gourds (the knobly kind) this year on her allotment in Glasgow, and has them drying around the house. She was quite chuffed as it involved a lot of hard work, and was somewhat problematic ...

                            I still don't know what carving kit to get - they have it so good in the States, with a wealth of craft shops! The Caning Shop sells a Gourd Saw Kit, and many other suitable tools, but they are electrical and only suited to the USA voltage.

                            Happy pyrographing! Happy gourding!


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                            • #15
                              Thought that I had better update on those bell gourds that I had ordered from Latitude Imports.

                              They arrived today and are much smaller than I had anticipated.

                              On their Webpage they describe the product as: Bell gourd. 14 x 8cm approx.

                              I assumed that this meant that they were 14 cm high and 8cm wide, a fairly reasonable size for starting off, I thought.

                              However it turns out that the measurements actually mean approximately 8cm high and 14cm in circumferece (some are smaller), effectively making them around half the size that I was expecting!


                              My five £7 worth of gourds they arrived in a slightly smaller than A4 size padded envelope ... I suppose they could be called 'cute', but I do feel rather disappointed ...


                              Auroralights, I eagerly await the arrival of gourds to your Site!

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