Ads

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

10 things not to say to a crafter

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 10 things not to say to a crafter



    We have heard it all before

  • #2
    Originally posted by Caroleecrafts View Post
    [ATTACH=CONFIG]42526[/ATTACH]

    We have heard it all before

    and the rest..................


    Linda

    Comment


    • #3
      A great list! People are sometimes so rude to crafters in a way they wouldn't be to other people. Just imagine going to see the doctor and then saying any of those things - people would be shocked!
      Lucy Blossom
      Shop and blog: http://www.lucyblossomcrafts.co.uk
      https://www.facebook.com/LucyBlossomCrafts

      Comment


      • #4
        I love this and hear these things all of the time when I'm selling at craft fayres - I've pinched it for my Facebook page, I hope you don't mind

        E. x
        Evie H
        Byeviebell
        http://byeviebell.com/

        Comment


        • #5
          Funnily enough I have just suffered one of those. Helped out at a Christmas Fayre yesterday for Age UK and donated some hand knitted kiddie stuff. A nice jacked for an 18 month boy, one and a half balls of decent wool which cost about 3.50 and 6 buttons. It was picked up and inspected and the lady looked me straight in the eye and said "I suppose you want a fiver for this" I responded "At the very least" and she dropped it like a red hot brick and walked away. I was just a tad gobsmacked.
          Carol
          God helps them that help themselves.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Critchley View Post
            Funnily enough I have just suffered one of those. Helped out at a Christmas Fayre yesterday for Age UK and donated some hand knitted kiddie stuff. A nice jacked for an 18 month boy, one and a half balls of decent wool which cost about 3.50 and 6 buttons. It was picked up and inspected and the lady looked me straight in the eye and said "I suppose you want a fiver for this" I responded "At the very least" and she dropped it like a red hot brick and walked away. I was just a tad gobsmacked.
            Wouldn't it have been great to be able to say "No, £50 is nearer the mark!"

            Linda

            Comment


            • #7
              Last week we went to a big Christmas fayre at our local garden centre. It's more like a market, but they change the stall holders every four days. Most stall holders are crafters, but not all. Anyway, last week there was a stall full of hand knitted garments. There were two ladies running it, but for the amount of stuff they were selling, it was easily a years worth of work. They had adult jumpers/cardis, hats, scarves, and baby clothes. I had a nose, but as a knitter, I do make my own - obviously I wouldn't say that, but I was nosing purely to see the prices. Only the baby stuff had prices marked on them - and they were ridiculously cheap. I know the amount of work that goes in to them, as well as the cost. I felt sad seeing it. The two ladies, were, in effect working for nothing....

              Sadly, I think people see knitting as cheap. It doesn't help with all the cheap wool available in pound shops - try knitting a jumper with that, one wash and it will shrink! I'm a fast knitter, but it would take me about 2 days solid to knit a jacket for an 18mth old. Just over one day for the knitting itself, and the rest is sewing it together, and adding buttons, and tidying up loose ends. So it is 2+ days work, plus materials.....a fiver really is a kick in the teeth. Plus, you wouldn't go into your local department store and offer a price for something you want to buy....you pay the price they're asking/on the ticket! So that alone, I find insulting, that people dare to 'haggle' instead of ask the price and either pay it or walk away.
              Charlotte x

              Comment


              • #8
                we were at a wood turning exhibition a couple of weekends ago. The prices they were charging for turned clocks,bowls and pens was amazing. Far too cheap and we told them and paid more, They were mostly elderly gentlemen who said as long as they cover the material costs they were happy.
                Casting pewter..in a field near you.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I can see that, the elderly people that do it purely to cover the costs so they can continue their hobby. For those who want to make a fair living from it though, that makes it incredibly hard! Last year, at the same Christmas fayre, there was an elderly lady selling the most beautiful miniature Fimo teddies. Fimo is really nothing new, people have been doing it for years, but hers were truly unique and unusual. Most of her items were Christmas themed, but not all. She used every day items, mostly antique ones, and stuck these teddies on them....we bought an antique iron, a cast iron one. You see those a lot in car boot sales, so they're not that unusual, but she had a few of them. I can't remember off hand what we paid for it, but I remember it being LESS than 10 euros - so unless she was selling off her own personal collection of antique irons and stuff, she was probably selling at a loss, and that's without taking into account the cost and time in making the Fimo bears. She had mice themed items too, and other one off animals, but teddies were the main ones. We also bought a lovely handmade wooden cart with these bears on....that one we did pay a little more for, but once again, nowhere near what it should have been. That was either 20 or 25 euros (can't remember), but it's big, and a lot of work has gone into it, as well as materials. For us, we got some wonderful handmade Christmas decorations, and pretty much at the kind of price we would have paid for mass produced stuff in a high street shop.....but that is very sad for fellow crafters trying to make a living. I would go as far as saying each bear in the items, probably used an entire pack (or not far off) of Fimo, costing about €3.50 a pack. They're all roughly 2 inches tall....we also bought a couple of Christmas bear coasters from her too, at 2 or 3 euros each - so LESS than the cost of the Fimo itself. We were probably her biggest customers....but if I was there as a crafter/stall holder, her next door to me would be my biggest nightmare! Even as a customer, I would happily have paid double what she was asking. These items now have pride of place for my Christmas table centre piece. In fact, it was that very lady that inspired me to try out Fimo myself. She didn't speak a word of English, nor I Dutch at the time (not much has changed on that front lol), but her work did the talking. Sorry the photo quality isn't great, we have a glass dining table, and I'm not good at taking photos with the reflection from it


                  IMG_1581.JPGIMG_1582.JPGIMG_1583.JPG
                  Charlotte x

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by craftdancer View Post
                    Wouldn't it have been great to be able to say "No, £50 is nearer the mark!"

                    Linda
                    I have an acquaintance who says almost EXACTLY that and more. She takes commissions from the very top echelons of international society (not talking mere 'celebrities' here but royalty and the like) for hand made baby goods, knitted from reeled silk, baby cashmere and the like. arity.

                    At a charity event where she was giving a talk, I saw her with a most ethereal shawl - like clouds, or fairy's wings - and some idiot asked her 'what brand of wool do you use, where can I get it and it is machine washable?'

                    She just laughed - nicely - and stated that 10 micron baby cashmere, 10 micron merino and hand-reeled filament silk, spun and plyed to a cobweb-weight yarn, is not routinely available for sale to the general knitting public in wool shops ...


                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ferrers caster View Post
                      we were at a wood turning exhibition a couple of weekends ago. The prices they were charging for turned clocks,bowls and pens was amazing. Far too cheap and we told them and paid more, They were mostly elderly gentlemen who said as long as they cover the material costs they were happy.
                      This is the problem that people like Bodrighy wood and myself have all the time. They might be happy just covering their costs but by not charging enough they are undervaluing my stock as well as theirs. As regards "haggling" I do not entertain that at all. My answer to all of this is someone will buy what I make for the (very fair) price I charge, I will happily wait for that person as then I know what I sell is appreciated by those that buy it.
                      Twitter:johnbaitken
                      website:The bowler hatted turner.co.uk
                      Facebook:John Boyne-Aitken

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I am an 'elderly lady' but I get very cross at other people in my age group who sell at craft fairs and the like, and undercut the market - and I tell them so, although their products don't compete with mine at all so there can be no accusations of sour grapes being flung around.

                        The response is, generally, as you say, 'I only want to cover my costs so I can continue doing something I love' or similar.

                        For the past couple of years, I've been responding to some of these crafters by suggesting that they consider selling at a profit to raise money for a charity they support, and start them off by giving them contact details of folk I know who are running a small charity event and would love to have a stall there selling lovely things, in return for a donation from the stallholder's profits.

                        I tell the person - with perfect truth - that I do this myself several times a year, donating all my profits to the charity, and suggest that they come with me to the next one.

                        It has started to work in two instances I know of - a gentleman who turns wood and acrylic has raised his prices considerably and all his profits go to one of the local hospices, and a lady who knits has doubled her prices; she sits at her little table piled high with beautifully-executed knitwear and merrily says, 'yes I know the mittens were £2.50 last time, but I'm raising money for the orphanage in Uganda where my granddaughter did her gap year, so now £2.50 covers the cost of the wool and the other £2.50 goes to the orphanage, that'll be £5, I'll pop this leaflet about the orphanage in your bag shall I ...'

                        And guess what? She sells just as much AND enjoys the entire process - knitting and selling - even more!


                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by eena View Post
                          I am an 'elderly lady' but I get very cross at other people in my age group who sell at craft fairs and the like, and undercut the market - and I tell them so, although their products don't compete with mine at all so there can be no accusations of sour grapes being flung around.

                          The response is, generally, as you say, 'I only want to cover my costs so I can continue doing something I love' or similar.

                          For the past couple of years, I've been responding to some of these crafters by suggesting that they consider selling at a profit to raise money for a charity they support, and start them off by giving them contact details of folk I know who are running a small charity event and would love to have a stall there selling lovely things, in return for a donation from the stallholder's profits.

                          I tell the person - with perfect truth - that I do this myself several times a year, donating all my profits to the charity, and suggest that they come with me to the next one.

                          It has started to work in two instances I know of - a gentleman who turns wood and acrylic has raised his prices considerably and all his profits go to one of the local hospices, and a lady who knits has doubled her prices; she sits at her little table piled high with beautifully-executed knitwear and merrily says, 'yes I know the mittens were £2.50 last time, but I'm raising money for the orphanage in Uganda where my granddaughter did her gap year, so now £2.50 covers the cost of the wool and the other £2.50 goes to the orphanage, that'll be £5, I'll pop this leaflet about the orphanage in your bag shall I ...'

                          And guess what? She sells just as much AND enjoys the entire process - knitting and selling - even more!
                          Well done Eena, I admire your enterprise in dealing with this sort of situation. And I admire those people who have listened to your suggestion and taken action.

                          Linda

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I feel I have to point out that the event I went to, was their own event with no other crafts there.
                            Casting pewter..in a field near you.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              My favourite one is "it'll take how long to make that?" crafting takes time if u wanted it by then u should of asked me earlier
                              Website: www.i-m.co/gsdesignscrafts/gsdesignscrafts
                              Facebook: www.facebook.com/g.sdesignscrafts Email: [email protected]
                              "A world without hats would be a very boring world indeed" Gavin Spence (me)

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X