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  • A new virus

    Just had this from our local PC Man if anyone is interested, luckily we only have Mac's so will not be affected:

    You may have heard on the news of a new virus that is doing the rounds and the fact that we have a two week window to prepare before it hits the UK.
    The threat is very real and the results can be exceptionally damaging so please read on and I will give you all the information I have on the virus and what you can do to try and prevent or lower the chances of being infected.
    Firstly the virus is only looking to infect Windows based operating systems so if you have an Apple Mac then you’re no need to worry. Similarly, the virus will not infect mobile phones, smart phones or tablets, only Windows based PC’s, laptop and servers.
    To date, approximately £60m has been harvested from bank accounts mainly in the U.S. The virus is extremely sophisticated and until recently it has been spreading across the globe at an alarming rate.
    The FBI, The National Crime Agency and other groups around the world have worked together to bring down the virus or at least slow it down. Approximately 500,000 infected servers have been taken offline in the last week and as a result the threat appears to have gone away but for how long. Experts say that we may have a two week window before the infection (BOTNET) is rebuilt and the fun and games begin again. Unfortunately good old Blighty appears to be among one of the next targets. It is also estimated that 15,500 computers in the UK may have already been infected so please read on and I’ll get to the most important part which is prevention and what to do if you think that your system may have been compromised.
    For those who are interested, it is believed that Evgeniy Bogachev, leader of a Russian Cyber Criminal group is responsive for the development of the virus and specifically the variant that I am discussing. The FBI are currently trying to find him and his associates.
    The virus spreads via email and it will arrive as a compressed ZIP or RAR file attachment. If you were to open the compressed ZIP or RAR file then you would find another file which is the one that will get you infected. The email might appear to have come from someone you know or it might appear to have been sent from a company that you are familiar with. Please do not open the initial ZIP or RAR attachment just delete the email and then empty your deleted items.
    If you were to execute the file within the compressed attachment then this is what might happen:
    1. Virus executes silently, joins your computer to a global BOTNET network and your computer becomes part of the problem.
    2. Virus will be silently monitoring your keystrokes in an attempt to gather financial details (Online banking details). If successful then the virus instigators will then have the facility to transfer funds to one of their accounts. Note that £60m has been stolen already to date.
    3. If the virus cannot successfully steal your banking information then a form of the Cryptolocker virus is then downloaded without your knowledge and phase 2 begins.
    4. The Cryptolocker virus will again silently run on your machine without your knowledge. It will then attempt to encrypt all of your files (photos, documents, spreadsheets etc).
    5, Once Cryptolocker has successfully encryped all of your files then a ransom message will appear on screen demanding a payment of what currently equates to between £300 to £1000.
    6. You cannot unencrypt your files without paying the ransom. The encryption uses 2048bit RAS encryption keys which is the same security used when you are transferring funds via online banking.
    How to prevent it happening.
    1. Do not open any attachment unless you are 100% sure that they are safe.
    2. Ensure that your antivirus product updates are current.
    3. Ensure that your Windows updates are installed whenever they are released.
    4. Make sure that your most important / cherished files are backed up. Note that the Cryptolocker virus can also infect USB connected memory sticks and external hard drives so the best advice is to backup and disconnect the backup device from the computer.
    5. If you are worried that you might have been infected then disconnect your computer from the internet straight away, turn it off and give us a call on 01428 606395.
    6. Be careful what you download from the internet as these sorts of virus’s change the way they work and mutate very quickly.

    Currently, the virus can only execute if you click on the file contained within the compressed email attachment. If you avoid opening the attachment then you’ll be ok.
    Safe surfing
    Andy (Trusted PC Man)
    Last edited by Caroleecrafts; 04-06-2014, 07:31 AM.

  • #2
    I now have a Cromebook, there's a lot about it which annoys me but at least it doesn't run Windows so I know I'll be safe.
    Visit Natty Netty for a huge selection of Iris Folding supplies

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    • #3
      I agree Netty other companies that can ensure their safety of this time of thing will do better and that windows is not the be all and end all of computing. I have used Mac's at home since their start 30 years ago, they update very month if not sooner for security etc and feel safe.

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      • #4
        I've just had an email from LinkedIn saying that someone wants to connect with me.....I'm suspicious of it as it was sent to an email unconnected to my LinkedIn account, when I logged on to my account, there's no mention of this connection invitation... I've deleted it. It seems the attack may have begun..... Or it could be something else.....and I'm being a drama queen

        Edit... I think I'm being a drama queen as it seems to be files that spread this virus not links. Still dodgy though I think.
        Last edited by Loody; 04-06-2014, 12:23 PM.
        Sarah x

        ~ The Lilac Dragonfly- Handmade Jewellery ~

        ~ Facebook Page ~




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        • #5
          Originally posted by Loody View Post
          I've just had an email from LinkedIn saying that someone wants to connect with me.....I'm suspicious of it as it was sent to an email unconnected to my LinkedIn account, when I logged on to my account, there's no mention of this connection invitation... I've deleted it. It seems the attack may have begun..... Or it could be something else.....and I'm being a drama queen
          There is always something about!

          It's really just about being sensible and vigilant - if you don't open files from email, you'll be ok. But it's a good reminder for us all, Caroline.

          I'm not entirely certain how any hacker or virus could actually transfer funds, though, even if they got your passwords as you need a bank card associated with the account and a card reader to set up a transfer.
          digital stamps for cardmakers: http://www.handmadeharbour.co.uk
          blog: http://handmadeharbour.blogspot.com
          hand painted personalised plaques, clocks, canvases, etc: http://www.1stuniquegifts.co.uk
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          • #6
            Must admit I was unsure about the bank thing Wendy unless it is the banks themselves but then that bypasses our computers. Still warned is better than not at least and anything suspicious we can deal with.

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            • #7
              The news has said they stolen £60 million already!! Mind boggling....!
              Sarah x

              ~ The Lilac Dragonfly- Handmade Jewellery ~

              ~ Facebook Page ~




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              • #8
                Thank you for posting this valuable information.
                Lyn
                Annie and Lyn
                www.rosiepink.typepad.co.uk

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Caroleecrafts View Post
                  Must admit I was unsure about the bank thing Wendy unless it is the banks themselves but then that bypasses our computers. Still warned is better than not at least and anything suspicious we can deal with.
                  Absolutely. There are still so many people who aren't sure about what's safe and what's not. I do worry about vulnerable people - my mum and dad both having Alzheimer's has opened my eyes to all sorts of things that can go wrong (my dad was s c a mmed a couple of times thinking he was winning things - and he was always very astute in his younger years. Fortunately he never learned to use a computer, or things could have been a lot worse).

                  And PayPal doesn't need a card reader to transfer money - maybe there are other places too.
                  digital stamps for cardmakers: http://www.handmadeharbour.co.uk
                  blog: http://handmadeharbour.blogspot.com
                  hand painted personalised plaques, clocks, canvases, etc: http://www.1stuniquegifts.co.uk
                  blog: http://www.1stuniquegifts.co.uk/blog

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