Ads

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Back to the Dark Ages - No Electricity

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Back to the Dark Ages - No Electricity

    Our electricity went off at 10.30pm last night (Wednesday). DH walked down the road to check other windows and all on our side were dark so we assumed that it was a power failure and went to bed cos there was nothing else to do. Consequently we were up at the crack of dawn having had our sleepout, to find, still no electricity. I finally rang the emergency line at 6.45am and was told "No, not a power failure, it must be on your property". They promised to ring back in 15 mins. Of course, the phones dont work either so had to give him a mobile number. 7.00am on the dot they called back and told me someone would be at our house in 20 mins. 10 mins later the front door went and there he stood. Certainly cant fault the service although we didn't get power until 5.30pm and still have a large crater at the top of the drive preventing us getting a car in or out and we are told that it will remain like that for at least 3 days. Apparently the men who dig the hole are different to the men who fill it in. Work that one out.
    Isn't it awful with no power. Even the gas cooker works off electricity.
    Carol
    God helps them that help themselves.

  • #2
    When I was little and lived in Shetland (yes, we did have electricity, and roads - but that's another story!!) there would always be power cuts at some point over the winter. We had oil lanterns that gave a lovely glow, and it was really rather nice! I remember helping mam decorate the Christmas cake with snowmen made from icing by candlelight one year.

    I hope that the hole gets filled in soon!

    Emma.
    Paperbuzz
    Adding a little magic to your celebrations


    www.noths.com/paperbuzz

    Comment


    • #3
      I remember when power cuts were commonplace (in the late 70's) but of course we didn't rely on electricity then like we do now.

      Most of our cookers were gas. we had no central heating so no worries with the electric programmer.

      The phone was connected to the plug in the wall direct to the GPO so no problem there.

      The television had no programmes after 10pm anyway (and even before then there were only 3!!)

      We had no computers or electrically powered games consuls.

      So an open fire and candles with hot water boiled on the gas stove and we were well away!!! oh the good old days

      Shame about the hole in the drive though! Hope the men who fill it in work weekends or you could find your three days meaning some time next week
      Diane
      Reach for the moon-if you miss-you'll still be amongst stars




      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by KullakitaCards View Post
        When I was little and lived in Shetland (yes, we did have electricity, and roads - but that's another story!!) there would always be power cuts at some point over the winter. We had oil lanterns that gave a lovely glow, and it was really rather nice! I remember helping mam decorate the Christmas cake with snowmen made from icing by candlelight one year.

        I hope that the hole gets filled in soon!

        Emma.
        I know it well, years ago I lived very much "in the sticks" for 14 years and we also had regular power cuts. Like you said, you learned to live with it. Open fires and parafin lamps. Toast on the end of long forks and all that.
        Actually, the only thing I really missed today was the computer. I think I need to get a life.
        Carol
        God helps them that help themselves.

        Comment


        • #5
          "Apparently the men who dig the hole are different to the men who fill it in. Work that one out"
          some people are made to break things and some people are made to fix um

          gem x
          http://www.facebook.com/pages/Soaps-...0932395?ref=ts

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Moonbeam Angel View Post
            I remember when power cuts were commonplace (in the late 70's) but of course we didn't rely on electricity then like we do now.

            Most of our cookers were gas. we had no central heating so no worries with the electric programmer.

            The phone was connected to the plug in the wall direct to the GPO so no problem there.

            The television had no programmes after 10pm anyway (and even before then there were only 3!!)

            We had no computers or electrically powered games consuls.

            So an open fire and candles with hot water boiled on the gas stove and we were well away!!! oh the good old days

            Shame about the hole in the drive though! Hope the men who fill it in work weekends or you could find your three days meaning some time next week
            I remember holidays like that on the Isle of Arran when I was little... it was so much more relaxed and family orientated than nowadays, it's sad in a way how times have changed.

            It's only in the last few years that we've talked my dad into having a pc/internet and cordless phone and now when he has a powercut it really gets to him... his house is all electric and always has been, but it's only losing the use of modern technology that really gets to him.

            Comment


            • #7
              The Winter's Tale

              and no electricity...

              When my husband and I built our house in 1985 (that was almost was the end of us - it's not easy building a house!), we put in a propane stove top...cooker i think y'all call it. Not the oven - our oven was electric. The hot water heater was propane, too.

              WELL. Out here in the boonies ( it was the boonies then, anyway), every time we had any ice storms (yes, in central Texas, believe it or not!) we would lose the electricity. Every blasted time. Our stove top had an automatic lighter, so we just had to light the burners with a match and we were good to go. AND we had a propane space heater someone had given us as a house warming prezzie...pardon the pun - it WAS intended! =)

              I can cook anything in a dutch oven on a burner or wood fire, that I can cook in an oven, even cakes, so we had no trouble dining in style, but we could not wash dishes because the pump on the well was electric. And we could not...flush. DANG! But we were experienced "rough" campers...

              Okay, so the very first winter - we got the electricity back fairly fast but the pump was frozen quite solid. My poor husband. He went out with an extension cord and a hair dryer. To no avail. Then, he duct taped the heating pad around the pump...again, to no avail. I mean, this is NOT a third world country...and it was the 1980s for gosh sakes...but there we were, no running water - pottying in buckets and burying it...I kid you not! We only had our two little daughters at that time...they thought it was all quite funny! Look mom, it's smoking!!! No, honey, it's steam...

              Funny thing was, that first blue norther, my husband had no warm hat, so he wore one of our little daughter's stretch pants on his head - we tied the legs in knots so the frigid air could not blow in...before the following winter we got a sheepskin hat we dubbed the Nanook of the North hat...

              I still had my Radio Flyer sled from my own childhood in South Carolina, Washington DC and Kansas City - all VERY cold and snowy/icy places - and we had some cardboard (all you need really) so they could trudge up the hill and slide down...my kids have always been fearless, much to my chagrin - riding bikes down the hill STANDING on the seat...godfrey! It's just that none of them EVER would do as i said...so I learned to shut my eyes....

              Do you want to hear anymore? I am drinking wine and listening to my fave music, and trying to block out a long day of grandkid sitting...actually feeling a bit sleepy...

              Comment


              • #8
                You should have popped round Carol, I'd have made you a cuppa!! Selina

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm loving hearing the stories about coping with no electricity
                  I remember the power cuts in the early 70's (someone or other on strike?) and treating them like an adventure.
                  If we have a power cut now, at least it gets the family talking rather than us watching/using the tv, xbox or pc etc...we play Scrabble or cards or something, or read a book

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I never dreamed you had weather like that in Texas. What an eye opener. I have a cousin who lives in the mountains in Phily where they dig tunnels through the snow to the highway and then share them with the Grizelies. We rarely get those sort of extremes in UK. Only with the rain. lol.
                    Carol
                    God helps them that help themselves.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I love hearing about your life cosmic, it's lovely reading about other people. Yep, candles are only romantic for a certain length of time, very pretty though. I remember my mum doing soup on a camping stove, took ages!
                      Facebook page, Cottage Charms & Cards: http://www.facebook.com/update_secur...20677888001883

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X