Ads

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

surviving the crunch

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • surviving the crunch

    With the credit crunch looming over us all like some big scarey monster, I thought I'd open a thread about money saving ideas and ideas to change life styles to get us all through it.

    To start with, we had a trial vegetable patch which we'll have to fine tune next year. it's no good have 60 lettuce plants all ready at the same time!!!
    We plan to increase it's size next year.

    We also plan to make a lot more jam and that sort of thing. There is an abundance of blackberries in the surrounding countryside.

    One thing we are also looking in to was drawn to our attention by a post on the fourm about paper log makers.
    currently our house is totally central heated, but we are now wondering if it would be a good idea to invest in getting the fire place re opened (currently it's bricked up) and then either having an open fire or a log burning stove. (ok initially they would cost, but may be a cost saver in the long run.)
    does anyone know what's the difference heat wise between an open fire and a stove?

    What idea's are you going to implement?
    full time mum and very very part time crafter.

  • #2
    What is hurting us the most is the gas and electricity bills. We pay by direct debit and have just been told that the bills for each are going to double!!! ouch!!!

    We have really got into the mode of switching off lights when no ones in the room, turning of tv, stereo whatever is on again when no one is watching it or listening to it. It is really hard because obviously I use loads of gas and electricity for making candles but instead of leaving the melters on and the oven/gas on and then go off to do something else I am making sure I only have them on for the length of time needed and put off again.

    Thinking about getting cavity wall insulation but hubby not keen because of the risk of dampness.

    Any other tips greatly received and what a brill thread.

    Cheers.

    Lisa

    Bowed Over
    Handmade Dog Collar Accessories
    www.bowedover.co.uk

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by beadsbydesign View Post
      currently our house is totally central heated, but we are now wondering if it would be a good idea to invest in getting the fire place re opened (currently it's bricked up) and then either having an open fire or a log burning stove. (ok initially they would cost, but may be a cost saver in the long run.)
      does anyone know what's the difference heat wise between an open fire and a stove?
      We're thinking of getting a multi-fuel stove, to save on heating bills. When I had one, in a previous house, I found it chucked out loads more heat than the open fire that was there before (and it's safer too). I've done tons of research, recently, into solid fuel burners, you can pick new ones up for a fairly reasonable price - http://www.stovesareus.co.uk/catalog/stoves-c-21.html is a good place to start looking, they have loads of stoves, ranging widely in price. They usually say what the heat output is too - there's a useful site here - http://www.flickeringflame.co.uk/tech_detail/tech.htm where you can calculate the heat output you need.
      Jayne


      "One must have chaos in oneself in order to give birth to a dancing star."

      Comment


      • #4
        Great idea for a thread, thank you!

        We've been switching the heating off as much as possible as it's just sooo expensive, and shutting the doors and curtains between rooms, especially to the rooms which never get used. It's such a waste to heat the whole house if you never go in certain rooms. We have a fleecy throw which we spread over ourselves when watching TV and it's quite cosy!

        And also we have been re-using our carrier bags in the supermarket as sainsbury's and tesco both give extra points for them now which can mount up and save on your shopping.

        And the best tip I can find it to prepare all of your own food - I was spending £3 a day on my lunch at one time - now I just spend a few £ on some sandwich ingredients and have these all week - saves about £50 a month! Which I usually spend on felt!

        I hope more tips come this way - we're all going to be rich!!

        Helen x

        Visit my blog!
        http://peggycrafts.blogspot.com/

        Website:
        www.peggycrafts.co.uk

        Etsy shop:
        www.peggycrafts.etsy.com

        Comment


        • #5
          with Gas and electricty prices, we check every six months who has the best deal for us. we do this by putting our figures in u switch, money supermarket.com, go compare.com and then compare the answers remember to do dual fuel and single tarrifs too.. We usually find that we are better off staying where we are with scottish power online tarriff. It works really well for us. There are never any estimated bills as you submit your own figures.
          On at least two occassions we've asked scottish power to move us to a different tarrrif that's recently been introduced. we estimate that we've saved loads by taking an hour every sixth months to check it out.

          recently one of Chris's old people told him about a social triff for families with an income of under £13500.00 with children under 16 / OAP/ disabled/ or suffers from a chronic illness. The scheme is run by n power and is called spreading warmth. http://www.npower.com/spreading_warm...riff/index.htm
          It promises discounts of up to £250. "Initially the annual discount will be applied as a one off discount of £125 per fuel on the first bill after 1st January 2009. From the 1st April 2009 the discount will be applied in quarterly discounts of £31.25 per fuel."
          This sounds brilliant if you are struggling with bills.
          However, with a little bit of digging around, it soon became apparent that our current generally available Scottish power dual fuel online 4 would still be approx £80 better off per year. (these figures are based on the £62.00 per month we currently pay)

          With the spreading warmth tariff you are not even on n powers cheapest tariff. You are placed on a Standard tariff and then the deductions are made to your bill.
          It seems to me that N power are trying to prey on vulnerable people. If you promise a social style tariff then it should be the cheapest you can offer as a company.
          So beware of this sort of con!
          full time mum and very very part time crafter.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by PeggyCrafts View Post
            And the best tip I can find it to prepare all of your own food -
            Helen x
            We've started buying from local producers. We buy our meat from a farm shop, where they rear much of the meat that they sell, the quality is fantastic and the prices beat the supermarkets hands down. Since we've stopped using the major supermarkets we've saved sooo much money. We always seemed to go in for a loaf of bread etc. and come out, having spent a fortune on 'bargains'. I know that we're really lucky that we area able to do this and not everyone has the luxury of living near local outlets.
            We prepare our own food too, we've got loads of recipes (that we've got from books, or, created ourselves) for delicious, quick, cheap meals that cost a fraction of what you'd pay for pre-prepared foods and they taste soooo much better, when you cook them yourself. I recently bought this book - (How to Feed Your Whole Family a Healthy Balanced Diet, with Very Little Money and Hardly Any Time, Even If You Have a Tiny Kitchen, Only Three Saucepans ... - Unless You Count the Garlic Crusher... http://www.amazon.co.uk/Family-Healt.../dp/1905862156) it's got loads of useful recipes, which can easily be adapted to you own taste.
            Jayne


            "One must have chaos in oneself in order to give birth to a dancing star."

            Comment


            • #7
              Me again!! I had an idea (which I've got no idea how it would work out in reality) but here goes.... I was thinking of a website for crafters where we could list our products with links (a bit like craftjuice) but, instead of charging the cash price (shown in the listing), we had a kind of points system, so, maybe £9.50 (inc postage) would translate into 950 points. Then, as well as our listings, if we wanted to, we could enter what we were looking for e.g. a bracelet with green stones - if another crafter had that item, they could then leave a message saying that they'd 'swap' the bracelet for an item, or, items (belonging to the person who made the request for the bracelet) that totalled the same number of points.
              Sorry, if that's a bit long winded but I just thought I'd get the ball rolling with suggestions of how we may be able to help each other
              Jayne


              "One must have chaos in oneself in order to give birth to a dancing star."

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by beadsbydesign View Post
                With the credit crunch looming over us all like some big scarey monster, I thought I'd open a thread about money saving ideas and ideas to change life styles to get us all through it.

                To start with, we had a trial vegetable patch which we'll have to fine tune next year. it's no good have 60 lettuce plants all ready at the same time!!!
                We plan to increase it's size next year.

                We also plan to make a lot more jam and that sort of thing. There is an abundance of blackberries in the surrounding countryside.

                One thing we are also looking in to was drawn to our attention by a post on the fourm about paper log makers.
                currently our house is totally central heated, but we are now wondering if it would be a good idea to invest in getting the fire place re opened (currently it's bricked up) and then either having an open fire or a log burning stove. (ok initially they would cost, but may be a cost saver in the long run.)
                does anyone know what's the difference heat wise between an open fire and a stove?

                What idea's are you going to implement?
                Good idea, we can pick each others brains. Don't be in a hurry to unbrick fireplace as you might be in a smokeless zone - although you have probably checked that - silly me.
                Carol
                God helps them that help themselves.

                Comment


                • #9
                  We have already turned heating down a notch or two and are in the process of changing light bulbs to ecconomy ones. Switched off all standby lights and don't clean teeth under running tap. I am open to any other suggestions.
                  Carol
                  God helps them that help themselves.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    We've bought a slow cooker - not only do they cost a lot less to run than using the oven but you can use cheaper cuts of meat because they go lovely and tender in it, so you save twice! It's also more convenient for me as dd is happy for me to make stuff in the moring but in the afternoon she tends to be getting tired and wants more attention so it's harder for me to chop veg then

                    The other thing we do is use Soapnuts for our laundry - they work out cheaper than washing powder. Then after washing you can boil them in a pan and make multi-surface cleaner from them (it can be used for the washing up, windows, worktops, even as screenwash in the car). So you also save the costs of cleaning products too. The only extra thing we use is some bicarb for the cooker/sink and we put a bit in the softener drawer with a couple of drops of essential oil to scent the washing.

                    I use cloth nappies on my daughter and I use cloth sanitary pads (and a Mooncup for the heavy days) so I don't have nappies or sanitary products in my shopping either.

                    We generally buy all our meat from the local butchers - it's actually cheaper than the supermarkets. We buy veg either from a local veg stall or get the Basics range from Sainsburys.

                    Our washer holds a huge load so we don't need to use it as often.
                    http://www.craftynclothy.com

                    http://www.folksy.com/shops/craftynclothy

                    http://craftynclothy.blogspot.com/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I love my slow cooker. Just stuff everything in and forget it.
                      full time mum and very very part time crafter.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by beadsbydesign View Post
                        I love my slow cooker. Just stuff everything in and forget it.
                        Me too, it's great for puds as well
                        Jayne


                        "One must have chaos in oneself in order to give birth to a dancing star."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Our new house, in process of total refurb, has masses of insulation, lovely and warm even though windows are open for drying plaster/paint etc – hope to be in within 4 weeks and will see if this translates into heating savings!

                          Using fleecy throws & 2 cats for warmth in the lounge.

                          My hubby puts the hairdryer on for about 30 secs under duvet before I get into bed – sooo warm and cheaper than leccy blanket.

                          We put washing machine on timer for 1am to use night rates, use warmth from sun in conservatory to dry clothes

                          I cook double batches of food – one to eat, one to freeze
                          Terry xxx
                          You can't have everything. Where would you put it all?" - Steven Wright
                          Website Twitter Facebook Blog Folksy

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            candlesbylisa" What is hurting us the most is the gas and electricity bills. We pay by direct debit and have just been told that the bills for each are going to double!!! ouch!!!"

                            Double check with yoru provider, we got similar letter about prices doubling, but we knew there was no way we were using that ammount of leccy. They had estimated and not only that, but over estimater by more than 75% the amount we were using. So we managed to get our bills down a bit. Just dont take their word for it.

                            Other ways we save money is buying all the 2 for 1 deals, especially if you can 2 diff things. My chum and i did our grocery shop together last week and bought nothin but 2 for 1 and special offers, it was great. Got lots of 2 for 1s then just split all the goods and bill at the end. Really helped.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Just remember to check you're not being conned with the offers...medium sized boxes of tea bags were on offer at 2 for £x but it actually still worked out cheaper to just buy a bigger box. Similarly we bought some soft drinks - it was cheaper to buy the 'pre-packed' as a 4 pack than buy the singles that were on special offer - I was because a woman in front of me had filled (and I mean filled to overflowing) her trolley with the single ones and she'd have saved much more by buying the 4-packs.

                              2 for 1's though you can't really go wrong with. I have to resist the temptation to buy stuff I wouldn't normally buy though
                              http://www.craftynclothy.com

                              http://www.folksy.com/shops/craftynclothy

                              http://craftynclothy.blogspot.com/

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X