Ads

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Interactive Craft Stall

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Interactive Craft Stall

    I Have booked a table at a craft fair, I have my items to sell, but I would like to show customers how to make their own (a really simple item but will help to show what is involved i.e time, patience and skills) . This would involve a few minutes tuition and hands on experience, they would have the item that they have made to take home with them with a label saying 'handmade by'. Has anyone else done this at a craft fair, what did you make, how did you manage it and was it successful?
    Any help and advice would be really appreciated.
    Tina


  • #2
    I do it sometimes at the larger outdoor shows. I have a notice saying 'Make your own mushroom or top' I charge £5 and get quite a few who want a go. In my case I had to make sure my insurance covered it which it does.

    Pete
    "Where the spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art" ... Leonardo Da Vinci
    Facebook

    Website

    Comment


    • #3
      I have made items at a craft fair but not a make and take it style. You may be should check with the organisers as if a craft fair to sell finished goods they may prefer you to demonstrate but not teach.

      Would you charge for the raw materials? Often organisers will let you have extra space to demonstrate but as said have done this to show me working but not for the customers to walk away with something they have done. Personally I think make and take's should be held at raw materials shows not craft fairs. You can still demonstrate the work involved by having work to complete on the day and this is always a crowd pleaser as they love to watch what you do.

      PS Good point of Pete's check your insurance, does it cover you to teach and demonstrate and charge for the materials

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Caroleecrafts View Post
        I have made items at a craft fair but not a make and take it style. You may be should check with the organisers as if a craft fair to sell finished goods they may prefer you to demonstrate but not teach.

        Would you charge for the raw materials? Often organisers will let you have extra space to demonstrate but as said have done this to show me working but not for the customers to walk away with something they have done. Personally I think make and take's should be held at raw materials shows not craft fairs. You can still demonstrate the work involved by having work to complete on the day and this is always a crowd pleaser as they love to watch what you do.

        PS Good point of Pete's check your insurance, does it cover you to teach and demonstrate and charge for the materials
        I agree re: not doing it at your average craft fair. As I said I do it at larger outdoor shows where I am in a gazebo or marquee. I do demonstrate at some other shows but not teach. It probably depends what your craft is as well though. As a wood turner I need space to set up a lathe safely with a safety screen and make shavings so the local fair in a town hall isn't really suitable. The more sedate crafts could be done perhaps but as said always check with the organisers as you will probably need more space. As Carol said it is a great way of attracting people and stops a lot of the 'do you make this' type of questions.

        Pete
        "Where the spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art" ... Leonardo Da Vinci
        Facebook

        Website

        Comment


        • #5
          We have done much the same thing at our Medieval shows, only we call them 'have-a-go' obviously the insurance was checked and a full risk assessment carried out, (the calligraphy one was three pages) I can only say that the activity gets very busy, If you are on your own you won't get much selling done so you will have to charge to make up for that. Alternatively if you have a helper, they can sell and you can demonstrate. I would ask first at any event if it would be allowed. Also another point to consider, are you being charged per table? you will need at least one for people to work at. You will not use that for selling so you loose the income from that table. Sorry if I've rambled on a bit, but good luck with it
          Casting pewter..in a field near you.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thank you for your replies. Alot of food for thought. The fair is a little local one in a pub garden, we will be in a marquee. I have discussed it with the person running it and he was happy for me to do it. There will be 3 of us, one selling, me instructing and my partner finishing the items off. I make pots and baskets by weaving newspapers.
            We were thinking of showing people how to make something similar to a corn dolly from newspaper sticks. But, yes thinking about all the rules regarding insurance etc I would probably have to provide goggles, rubber gloves against the newspaper print, at least 3 meters around each person etc. I could go on and on, what happened to common sense?
            I think I will skip that idea and just have another table demonstrating how the items are woven and varnished. It does get a bit frustrating when people look at what I have made only for them to say 'Oh I thought they were manufactured baskets', it would have been nice to let them try the process themselves, and not having to keep repeating that they are made from newspapers. (I do have a sign up describing the process but that seems to get ignored as well).
            Never mind. By the way, how dangerous can calligraphy be, I couldn't believe you had 3 pages of risk assessment!!!!!
            Tina

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by tinasragbag View Post
              Never mind. By the way, how dangerous can calligraphy be, I couldn't believe you had 3 pages of risk assessment!!!!!
              Tina
              Nibs being shove into someone's eye if their lettering is better. Ink being drunk if thirsty the list could be endless as there are some mindless idiots out there.

              When I think what I used to get up to when young, surprised still here to tell the tale, did me no harm at all. I think we have to give jobs to people to think up the pitfalls of any activity, well they need the pay. Hence why sport is not done in every school 1. Because of the competition thing, heavens forbid we compete! life is one big competition. 2. In case one of the little darlings get a rounders bat round the bonce and mummy and daddy sue the school. I can remember the damage done by hockey sticks and lacrosse can be as bad if not worse. If only life was a bed of roses, NOT!!!

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks Caroleecrafts for cheering me up and making me laugh. It is hard enough trying to sell our crafts without all of these rules and regs. What on earth is happening to everyone?
                And don't get me onto school, I used to play hockey, rounders, kiss chase, blind mans buff, conkers, and all on a concrete playground. I would love to see the risk assessments for them. I thought life was one long risk, that is how you learn.
                Sorry, not very crafty. So back to my craft fair.....I have definitely decided to do the demo table instead. Hopefully it will get some interest and I can sell from my other table. The fair is this coming Thursday, so must make up my mind today so I can be prepared.
                Perhaps we should start a thread on risk assessments for different crafts could be interesting but also VERY entertaining!!
                Tina

                Comment


                • #9
                  "Perhaps we should start a thread on risk assessments for different crafts could be interesting but also VERY entertaining!!"
                  How about a risk assessment for posting on a forum? That could be a very dangerous thing to do, especially if you feel an item made "is not for you" who knows what sort of mental problems that could cause a maker!!
                  From experience if you demonstrate at a show your sales may decrease. Originally I thought demos would draw in the crowds (which it does) and then they would be more likely to buy but what actually happens (with me anyway) is every bloke that sees you demo has to tell you that they used to be a turner and the ladies always say" it's fascinating and very nice but where would I put it?" It can turn into a very hard day's work for little return. It shouldn't all be about money though, sometimes it is nice to show kids how things are/were made.
                  Twitter:johnbaitken
                  website:The bowler hatted turner.co.uk
                  Facebook:John Boyne-Aitken

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I am fortunate and have someone doing the selling when I am demoing or doing tuition spots. I agree with John that if you are on your own or too close to the table of goods for sale you will attract attention but not necessarily sales. One advantage is that people don't keep asking 'Did you make this yourself?' Well not as much. One other disadvantage that I and perhaps John find is that however hard you try you get dust and shavings over your table which I suppose gives an added air of authenticity. If I was on my own at the stall I don't think I would bother doing any 'have a go' spots and possibly not demoing either.

                    Pete
                    "Where the spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art" ... Leonardo Da Vinci
                    Facebook

                    Website

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Oops! I feel as though I have been punched twice. I weave pots and baskets from newspapers that I roll into sticks and weave, I do not use lathes, wood or anything dangerous. I just enjoy showing people how to do a simple craft that they would probably never have thought of but would enjoy. Crafts are dying out now with the buy and throw age. At one time crafts were the only thing that kept a family going by 'making and mending'. I am going to do my demo table and show people exactly what they could make if they put their minds and a little time to it.
                      Tina

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        You would not believe what goes into a risk assessment! If our entire group attends a show and we are asked for a risk assessment then they are provided with a 22 page bound A4 document complete with header page and copyright notice on the back. Then the client is miffed when I ask for a copy of THEIR assessment. I tell them, as we are mentioned in their document then we are legally entitled to see it. Often I have a scrap of half an A4 sheet for the whole site. At least I have done my job.
                        Last edited by ferrers caster; 29-07-2014, 12:27 AM. Reason: spelling
                        Casting pewter..in a field near you.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X