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  • Taking photographs for web site

    Hello
    Im only just starting out with my new web site, but I have found that the photographs I am taking of the products just isnt showing thier true beauty...any top tips on photography?

    Thanks
    Sarah

  • #2
    Have you got some kind of programme such as photoshop, I use this and find that if you can just take a normal (not fantastic) photograph you can then tweak it using the computer software and it looks a lot better!

    Helen

    Visit my blog!
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    • #3
      Hello Helen, Thanks for that, yes I do have photo shop (lol) you wouldnt believe it though. I've just been reading about a light box, do you know if these are good?
      Sarah

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      • #4
        I don't know if this will help, but a friend of mines who's good at photography always photos things for Ebay in the bath (that is she puts the items in the bath - not takes a photo whilst in the bath herself!!!) -gives a good white reflective light. Don't know how well it would work for craft things but might be worth a try.

        p.s. - make sure the bath is empty first
        "Human beings, who are almost remarkable in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so" - Douglas Adams


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        • #5
          lol Thanks for that, I will give it a go.
          Sarah

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Autumn Faerie View Post
            I don't know if this will help, but a friend of mines who's good at photography always photos things for Ebay in the bath (that is she puts the items in the bath - not takes a photo whilst in the bath herself!!!) -gives a good white reflective light. Don't know how well it would work for craft things but might be worth a try.

            p.s. - make sure the bath is empty first

            Although my bath is a puce pink colour - not sure how nice that would look!!

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            • #7
              I make jewellery and place the item on just a plain laminated white card - the light is the main thing so you need to find a south facing window or conservatory and only take photos between about 11 and 3pm. i tried to make a light box but it didn't work - the bath does sound excellent, will have to give that a go. Will pop a photo of one of my pieces to see what kind of effect you can get with my set up

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              • #8
                Website photography

                Originally posted by autumn rose View Post
                Hello
                Im only just starting out with my new web site, but I have found that the photographs I am taking of the products just isnt showing thier true beauty...any top tips on photography?

                Thanks
                To get the best photos for your sie natural light is best. Failing that you need 100w bulbs and ideally a light tent. Can be bought on action sites alot more cheaply than in Camera stores.

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                • #9
                  Thanks for your tips!

                  I have found the natural light ones to be the best pics so far, I tried to make a light box too, failed miserably lol
                  The tent (home made style) would that just be a white sheet ?

                  Thanks again everyone
                  Sarah

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                  • #10
                    I've just had a mare uploading photos to my site! They look a bit pants so I'm going to try some of the tips.

                    Before you upload photos don't make the mistake I did and load them directly from the programme which stores the photos. I've had to resize all of mine for the web which makes them quicker to load on your site.

                    Heres what I did:
                    Install a programme like Irfan View to edit phots
                    Then save the photo for Web and then in the pixels box resive to about 500 pixels. That way they will upload quicker on your website. Mine were all over 1000kb now and they should only be about 50kb.

                    Sarah
                    Baby bibs with a difference...
                    We now do t-shirts up to 4 years!
                    www.bibbledribble.co.uk
                    http://www.folksy.com/shops/BibbleDribble

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                    • #11
                      photgraphs

                      A photographer once told me to arrange small items to be photographed on a white background (sheet, table cloth is ideal) on the floor next to a patio door & photograph them looking down at them.

                      Make sure its a sunny day & do it when the sun is at its best - 12-3pm

                      I did this when I wanted to send some pics to my son via email & they turned out fine - very clear.

                      Happy snapping

                      Sharon

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                      • #12
                        Good Photos

                        The key to getting a good webshot is correct exposure, if you manage to acheive this then your colours will be accurate and you will have all the
                        detail in the image that you can then take into Photoshop to enhance.
                        I like to use white backgrounds for all my webshots to keep a continuity.
                        I use two flashheads with soft boxes and my camera on manual setting.
                        If you haven't got fancy equipment then natural window light can be good used with white reflectors. Cameras on automatic settings often over-expose and make colours look muddy so this is something to look out for.
                        One of the things I enjoy most about packshot photography is the different effects you can get from using camera angles, it can be a very subtle thing and it is something you could consider.
                        Chris W.
                        x
                        Gemstone Jewellery and Gifts

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                        • #13
                          Thanks to all of you, sound advice!
                          Sarah

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                          • #14
                            ive just starting photographing my jewellery to put on my website. I bought a light cube thing, i forget the exact make of mine but if you google it you will find one. There is one called EZcube i think but its very expensive, mine was only £20 i think. It gives you a plain, professional backgroun and softens the lighting so you dont get any glare with shiny objects.

                            to avoid blur in your photos, use a tripod, again these are inexspensive if you just buy a cheap one to do these with or mayb you know someone you can borrow one from?
                            if your photographing something small or want to be close up, you need a camera that has a good zoom, or preferable a macro setting. this is usually indicated by a flower type symbol. what kind of camera do you have? it's probably on a dial along with other settings such as night, day, auto etc.

                            good luck!

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                            • #15
                              Hi guys
                              I've have just run a workshop about photographing your craft and the way I teach is to find yourself a good spot next to a window, but not one with the sun streaming through as that will make heavy shadows, or even go outside in the shade.
                              Get a piece of white paper or card and curve it against something so as it makes a curved background and base.
                              And then have a play with different angles, move your item around to get the best angle and move the camera down to the level of the item rather than shooting directly above. You won't get it right with the first shot, even I don't!
                              Another good thing to check out on any camera is the ev setting - to get that nice white background increase it to the point where it looks good - have a look in the camera manual to find out where it is (even cheap compact cameras have this function).
                              You really don't need lights, cubes, expensive cameras but you really do need to practice.
                              X
                              Hmade.co.uk

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