Ads

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

First Aid at Craft Fairs

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • First Aid at Craft Fairs

    I guess this is really one for the craft fair organisers. I was having a conversation the other day with someone who organises craft fairs and the subject of first aid provision came up. When I asked about first aid cover, they kind of shrugged their shoulders and said they'd ask 'if there was a doctor in the house' then laughed. This worried me a bit and as there are several threads on here from people who are looking to organise their own fairs, I wondered how widespread this was. Strictly speaking, if you organise any event at which the public are present, you should have some form of first aid cover for the duration of the event. I have done first aid training and am covered under St John's Ambulance insurance and always carry a mini first aid kit, so I do have some - even though I'm only organising one event myself this year. We all hope these skills won't be needed but if an organiser was to find themself in such a situation, would they know what to do and what their responsibilities are? I think for small events you can probably get away with a first aider amongst your staff/helpers (tho they need to make sure they carry insurance as the implications are scary if you provide the wrong kind of assistance!) and I believe the official recommendations are 2 first aiders to 1000 visitors.

    Any thoughts/comments/experiences from others?
    Jane

    If beads were still currency, I'd be a millionaire!


    http://www.wildheartcrafts.co.uk/

  • #2
    A risk assessment should be done - for expected visitors over x amount.
    There should be a qualified first aider for every so many expected visitors.
    All traders, marshalls, should be aware of who and where the first aiders are.


    many events I do I have to do my own risk assesment before being allowed to book space.


    For small events, not sure - worth a check with H&S maybe?

    Jane
    www.just-soaps.com
    Twitter JUSTSOAPS
    FB www.facebook.com/pages/Just-Soaps/258910018463
    Natural Handmade Olive Oil Soaps and Skincare free from SLS, Parabens, and other Nasties

    Comment


    • #3
      It is a tricky one, Jane, and I've seen plenty of discussions about insurance and what happens if someone trips over your table/tablecloth/boxes, etc, but not much about what the organisers' responsibility is then if they're injured. I'm luckier than most in that I worked for 7 years as an event manager so I'm trained up in risk assessment, crowd management, health & safety, first aid, etc, and I know just how difficult it can be to organise events safely and all the legislation you need to work to. It's why so many small events have gone under over the past few years. It still surprises me how many people think if they carry a first aid box, they're covered but if you use any of the supplies in there in the wrong way, you can be held liable if you do more damage. I don't want to alarm people but I do think for those organising events for the first time, it is something they need to incorporate into their planning.
      Jane

      If beads were still currency, I'd be a millionaire!


      http://www.wildheartcrafts.co.uk/

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Wildheart View Post
        It is a tricky one, Jane, and I've seen plenty of discussions about insurance and what happens if someone trips over your table/tablecloth/boxes, etc, but not much about what the organisers' responsibility is then if they're injured. I'm luckier than most in that I worked for 7 years as an event manager so I'm trained up in risk assessment, crowd management, health & safety, first aid, etc, and I know just how difficult it can be to organise events safely and all the legislation you need to work to. It's why so many small events have gone under over the past few years. It still surprises me how many people think if they carry a first aid box, they're covered but if you use any of the supplies in there in the wrong way, you can be held liable if you do more damage. I don't want to alarm people but I do think for those organising events for the first time, it is something they need to incorporate into their planning.

        That is why many doctors do not attend to emergencies in these scenarios - because they are open to litigation - it is called the "Good Samaritan Syndrome"

        Even if you have first aid training, you are best just to stick on a plaster and call an ambulance!
        Sounds hard - but I have seen too many people end up in court for trying to help

        Jane
        www.just-soaps.com
        Twitter JUSTSOAPS
        FB www.facebook.com/pages/Just-Soaps/258910018463
        Natural Handmade Olive Oil Soaps and Skincare free from SLS, Parabens, and other Nasties

        Comment


        • #5
          And yet I've seen the opposite syndrome as well. I organised a float procession - schoolkids with artwork made with community artists - and one of my artists twisted her ankle getting down from the back of the lorry. There must have been at least six people rushed forward, saying they were first aiders and I had to keep them back until I had my official first aiders arrive!
          Jane

          If beads were still currency, I'd be a millionaire!


          http://www.wildheartcrafts.co.uk/

          Comment


          • #6
            i am a first aider both at work and in the local church where we hold our craft fairs and we always have about 5 first aiders at the events but i have been to events where i have been the only one and i have only been attending the event as a crafter
            while i knit i think

            http://foxyscraftythoughts.blogspot.com

            http://thecraftyfox.misi.me.uk

            Comment


            • #7
              Hmm - taking this further, should crafters with electrical equipment have a suitable fire extinguisher as the venue will have been assessed re fire protection with the equipment which belongs there (I think).
              ElaineJ soap and other stuff
              website
              blog

              Comment


              • #8
                Very interesting point and one that had never occured to me previously. Maybe if a crafter was a qualified first aider the organiser could offer them a stall for free if they agreed to be event's official first aider

                In a previous job my manager nominated me to become the qualified first aider for our shift, I was tempted (mainly due to the days off work to attend the course) but had to decline as I can't even watch Holby or Casualty on TV I'm that squeemish.
                Visit Natty Netty for a huge selection of Iris Folding supplies

                Comment


                • #9
                  nattynetty i'm the other way round i have had to deal with some really bad accidents at work (i work in a large factory with a lot of very clumsy men!!!!!) but if i get a small cut with a little blood , about the size of a paper cut, i have been known to faint - gives hubby a good chuckle
                  while i knit i think

                  http://foxyscraftythoughts.blogspot.com

                  http://thecraftyfox.misi.me.uk

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ElaineJ View Post
                    Hmm - taking this further, should crafters with electrical equipment have a suitable fire extinguisher as the venue will have been assessed re fire protection with the equipment which belongs there (I think).
                    I thinks it's always worth making yourself very aware of all fire exits and escape routes in the event of an incident. walk the route, check your exits, etc . . can't always guarantee that a risk assessment is up to date . . or exists . . it's often something left completely to chance because it's often forgotten about.

                    The main advice now from fire safety consultants and the Fire Service is . . if you can raise the alarm do so . . then leave by a fire exit/escape route asap . . leave fire fighting to the experts!

                    If you have been trained to use fire extinguishers on an accredited training course than perhaps . . after carrying out a quick risk assessment of an incident . . you may decide to use a dry powder extinguisher . . best and safest for most small fires.

                    In most cases tho . . leave asap and follow all instructions given to you by fire marshalls.
                    Gloria

                    www.dichro-findings.co.uk
                    Etsy Shop
                    Artfire Shop
                    dichro-findings blog

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ElaineJ View Post
                      Hmm - taking this further, should crafters with electrical equipment have a suitable fire extinguisher as the venue will have been assessed re fire protection with the equipment which belongs there (I think).
                      Another valid point. I'm sure not all organisers ask to see valid PAT certificates.
                      Jane

                      If beads were still currency, I'd be a millionaire!


                      http://www.wildheartcrafts.co.uk/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Im a nurse so I legally have to stop and help or Ill risk loosing my registration. Although Im only paediatric trained, and there is some quite big differences in child and adult anatomy and physiology, so as long as I only do things which im competent in, and do whatever I do to the best of my ability, I cant be sued or anything like that. So i wouldnt be expected to perform any kind of bone manipulation or anything like that, becasue Ive never done it and am not trained in doing so, but I have done intermediate life support, so would be expeceted to do CPR etc. and to do it correctly until i was too tired and couldnt do it anymore. I like the idea of getting into a fair for free with that skill though! Ive just finished working behind the bar at the grand national, where I got glass stuck in my foot, I was handed a plaster by the manager and told to get out from behind the bar and sort it, I said I might need something to clean it with, so she gets out her phone, I said what are you doing? she said ringing an ambulance(!). I dont think many people have a clue about first aid!
                        I like to make things - usually a mess!
                        Please look at my stuff and let me know what you think!
                        http://elephantfrills.blogspot.com/

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X