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View Full Version : Help the skin on my hands is cracking!



Raw-elements
27-09-2010, 01:48 PM
Can anyone recommend a good barrier cream? I am working on a large piece using loads of polymer clay and my hands are cracking. I have some badger balm but am not sure whether it is OK to use with polymer. Also does anyone use latex gloves are they a better option? Where do you buy them from?

Any advise will be greatly appreciated!

Thanks

Anita

Seahorse
27-09-2010, 02:01 PM
You should be able to get big packs of gloves drom places like Robert Dyas, maybe Boots would have them.
Not sure about barrier cream but maybe bio oil could work.

removed10
27-09-2010, 02:35 PM
You might want to try nitrile gloves rather than latex...some people react to latex. But your hands will sweat inside whatever glove you get...it can be icky! Maybe put some lanolin on your hands before putting the gloves on, to give your hands a spa treatment - a little goes a long way! I have no idea if the lanolin would be bad for the clay if any seeped out though.

The better the fit of the glove, the more it pulls the little hairs on the back of your hand - it's worse putting them on than taking them off! At least that's been my experience. But you would want a tight fit so you could manage the clay better. Looser fit would be awkward and irksome!

Raw-elements
28-09-2010, 11:04 AM
Thank you both!

Anita

pixieposy
28-09-2010, 11:25 AM
Also, moisturise your hands with pure shea butter to prevent them drying out in the first place. It's good stuff, I swear by it.

Bev478
30-09-2010, 09:28 PM
How about "Gloves in a Bottle"? I've only just got hold of this but seems to work quite well as a barrier cream. The ends of my fingers quite often split because of frequent washing between colour changes, so I bought a small bottle of this. Yet to put it through a thorough test - but looks promising. Hands don't stain as badly so wash off easier. If it works I will invest in the full size bottle.

Autumn Thyme
31-05-2012, 05:11 PM
Hi :) This is an interesting one for me as I need to protect my hands.

Anyone know if Elizabeth Arden Eight Hour Cream would be OK to use?

I have a few tubes of it, so that would save me buying something else if it is compatible.

Cheers,

Autumn :D

Incognito 1
01-06-2012, 12:50 PM
Put cotton gloves under the 'rubber' gloves to absorb the moisture. People are often allergic to the powder on gloves too. Are you allergic to the polymer clay? I don't know what is in it but after eight years I've developed an allergy to the polymer in artificial nails.

Autumn Thyme
01-06-2012, 01:04 PM
Hi:D

No, I'm not allergic to it (yet anyway), but I do suffer from eczema at times, so wish to exercise caution.

Cheers,

Autumn

Mythillogical
01-06-2012, 01:21 PM
You might want to try nitrile gloves rather than latex...some people react to latex. But your hands will sweat inside whatever glove you get...it can be icky! Maybe put some lanolin on your hands before putting the gloves on, to give your hands a spa treatment - a little goes a long way! I have no idea if the lanolin would be bad for the clay if any seeped out though.

I'm not allergic to latex, but I am allergic to lanolin! Some eczema sufferers might need to be wary about using lanolin for the same reason. With moisturisers and polymer clay I'd be more inclined to give yourself a real moisture treatment the night before you intend to work on something- put on lots of moisturiser and put on cotton gloves before bed (socks would do if you don't have gloves!) then after you've made your piece, wash your hands and then moisturise well too.

I've never known polymer clay to irritate my skin- which is odd because at times it has been ridiculously sensitive (even react to my own sweat, and plain water dries it out like crazy!- a few years ago I had to shower 3 times a day with emulsifying ointment!) but I would get very cracked hands if I was washing them a lot to keep the clay clean, which is partly why I always use scrap clay rubbed around my hands to clean them. If it is an allergy to the clay a mild antihistamine might help.

Incognito 1
01-06-2012, 03:47 PM
Hi:D

No, I'm not allergic to it (yet anyway), but I do suffer from eczema at times, so wish to exercise caution.

Cheers,

Autumn

How do you know its not an allergy? I suffered dry, itching skin for months before working out mine was contact dermatitis ie an allergy. It went from dry and itchy to red and peeling but it just looked like very dry skin for months. The doctor said that people with excema, hayfever, asthma etc are the most likely people to develop allergies to lots of things.

Cocoa & Heart
01-06-2012, 07:57 PM
Hi,

not sure, whether this is the same, but my mum is a potter and suffer with dry & cracked hands/skin. She finds E45 cream is the best one. It is non-alergic and she uses is when she finishes for the day (so probably not suitable whilst you working with the clay, but your hands will be more prepared for the harsh work).

Incognito 1
01-06-2012, 08:12 PM
No worries, just thought I would mention it. As I said, it took me months to realise what was happening. I am a Scientist so I'm not daft but it took me months to work it out. I kept using moisturiser and taking care of my hands but they were so dry. It has taken two months to get them anywhere near normal after exposure to the polymer.

If you do a Google search you will find that some people are allergic to something in polymer clay and you are in the 'at risk group' as indicated by your other allergy.

Autumn Thyme
06-06-2012, 11:33 AM
How do you know its not an allergy? I suffered dry, itching skin for months before working out mine was contact dermatitis ie an allergy. It went from dry and itchy to red and peeling but it just looked like very dry skin for months. The doctor said that people with excema, hayfever, asthma etc are the most likely people to develop allergies to lots of things.
Thanks for the advice - that's given me something to think about. I will keep a close check on symptoms :)

zazu
06-06-2012, 07:59 PM
I wouldnt post here if I didnt believe in the products but I have recently become a Forever Living distributor and have been using friends and family as my guinea pigs for a number of their products to help various ailments. They really do work & great for skin conditions.

Indivijewelistic
06-06-2012, 09:17 PM
In the shop I use liquid gloves because I am using PMC, glue and such and when making jewellery I cannot have my hands covered with cream. It works for me. My son uses it too, he is a motorcycle mechanic - seems to help him.