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sweet
12-05-2008, 11:03 AM
Hi everyone,

I was looking at getting a couple of my paintings printed for friends and family, how do i go about this? is the best way to use a company who spe******es in copying paintings to print, or can I scan them onto my computer and copy them that way? I have an epson stylus photo scanner & printer. I want them to look v.good quality

humph, i hope i explained that properly! lol

ty.s.x

JBJB
12-05-2008, 05:57 PM
I would say you want someone who can output large files to a decent printer.

Have you any of those "we personalise anything" type shops near you - you know, the ones who turn your granny into a jigsaw and put your children onto mugs?

linz
12-05-2008, 10:39 PM
I was speaking to someone who sells their prints, and he gets a lady who is a professional photographer to take photos of his paintings, then he prints them out on his own a3 printer. They looked pretty good quality to me.

sweet
12-05-2008, 11:53 PM
I would say you want someone who can output large files to a decent printer.

Have you any of those "we personalise anything" type shops near you - you know, the ones who turn your granny into a jigsaw and put your children onto mugs?

lol...

Unfortunatly not! I'll have to keep searching!

sweet
12-05-2008, 11:55 PM
I was speaking to someone who sells their prints, and he gets a lady who is a professional photographer to take photos of his paintings, then he prints them out on his own a3 printer. They looked pretty good quality to me.

thats a good idea! i know someone who is a semi-pro photographer! have ti be nice to him! :D

Ian Beckerton
13-05-2008, 01:20 AM
Hi Sweet

Now it just so happens that I have done a bit of this my self, not that they were my paintings, they were an ex girlfriends sisters and I made up a portfolio for her for Christmas.

The approach I used was, use what was their!! All the images were taken on Transparency (This was only a year ago) using window light and all the paintings were propped up on a chair. I used a Nikon F100 with a 20-35mm zoom lens and essentially I used a tripod.

Once I had the images back from my processors I scanned them into my PC using a Nikon Coolscan 5000 ed scanner. I scanned the images at a resolution of 4000 dpi and had file sizes of about 30mb for each image.

Once I had them digitised I then re processed them in photoshop, printer them out as A4 on my A3 printer and mounted them for presentation.

These are some of the images I produced. Click on the link to Flickr then painted images and slide show.

Regards,

I..

sweet
14-05-2008, 01:13 AM
Hi Sweet

Now it just so happens that I have done a bit of this my self, not that they were my paintings, they were an ex girlfriends sisters and I made up a portfolio for her for Christmas.

The approach I used was, use what was their!! All the images were taken on Transparency (This was only a year ago) using window light and all the paintings were propped up on a chair. I used a Nikon F100 with a 20-35mm zoom lens and essentially I used a tripod.

Once I had the images back from my processors I scanned them into my PC using a Nikon Coolscan 5000 ed scanner. I scanned the images at a resolution of 4000 dpi and had file sizes of about 30mb for each image.

Once I had them digitised I then re processed them in photoshop, printer them out as A4 on my A3 printer and mounted them for presentation.

These are some of the images I produced. Click on the link to Flickr then painted images and slide show.

Regards,

I..

thanks Ian for the advice! I'm glad it's that simple! I think i can manage that, well at least the guy who i'm going to 'borrow' can manage it!

s.x

indri
14-05-2008, 08:38 AM
I know someone who does watercolours and sells prints of them. I believe she goes to somewhere like Office world (now staples I believe - showing my age office world disappeared years ago from Cov!). They do printing/photocopying etc. The prints looks good quality and sell really well. My mum ends up making lots of little labels for her so that she can stick the title/painter to the outside of the cellophane packaging... labels have to be in English and Welsh!!!

gorjuss
28-06-2008, 07:01 PM
If you're scanner is good enough, scan them at over 300dpi. if the paintings are too large, then try scanning them in sections and piecing them together in some Photoshop-esque type software!

As for prints, always go for archival pro quality fine art prints.. not just 'cheap copies' or printouts.. then your customer base will be back for more ;)

elysee
01-07-2008, 07:55 AM
High quality prints always look better - but sometimes I simply duplicate my work by scanning and printing out - I have quite a good printer tough!

craftbox-cards
16-10-2008, 07:32 PM
I regularly take prints from oil paintings.
I scan wherever I can (I've a mid range scanner - cheap is no good) and use Photoshop when I need to stich together multiple images (you don't need Photoshop nowadays - many packages will do this). This works very well.
I do also take digital photographs of very large paintings and then manipulate to straighten adjust colour, sharpen, etc. This is often more work but gives a respectable result.
I print onto a laser printer.
If you really can't face any of this then independant local computer shops will often do this for you. Worth also looking through the small adds in local papers.
Good luck.

edenworkshops
29-10-2008, 06:14 PM
Not to forget that Hahnemhule the German spe******t paper supplier, carries several different water colour papers that have been ink jet coated.

I can vouch for this paper, the results were superb, I was dealing with large images (40 plus mb) but my epson A3 printer coped with them without a hitch.

Richard